Get Started Guide

Get Started With Linux

Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and most servers. It was originally developed as a hobby by Linus Torvalds in 1991, and is now developed by an international community of contributors. It’s the most popular operating system for servers, though it has also found success on desktops with the help of applications such as Ubuntu or Xubuntu

Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and most servers.

Linux is an open source, meaning it’s available to be viewed, improved and changed by anyone who wants to contribute their own changes.

Linux has become very popular in recent years because of its security, reliability and speed. The main reason for this success is its ability to run on low-cost hardware as well as high-quality server hardware (which typically costs more money). In addition to being used in servers for large companies with multiple sites across the world, many home users have adopted Linux due to its ease of use and flexibility.

When you type the command “PWD” it tells you the current working directory

The pwd command stands for present working directory. It tells you the current directory you are in, which is useful if you want to know where your desktop looks when it’s closed and opened. When I type pwd, it shows me my home directory (also known as “current working directory”). I can also use this command to find out where other files are located on my system, by typing “ls -l.”

PWD stands for show present working directory

The pwd command is the most basic way to find your current working directory. It stands for “print working directory” and will print out the path of your current location in a Unix-like operating system.

What does it mean?

  • A directory is any place on a filesystem (such as /home/user) that contains files and other folders such as .docx, .jpg and .txt. This can include subdirectories as well!

The Linux ‘CP’ command copies files and directories, not hard links. In contrast, ‘ln’ creating hard links to files and directories.

The cp command copies files and directories. It’s not used to create hard links, though. In contrast, ln creating hard links to files and directories.

The basic commands of linux

  • ls – lists files in a directory
  • cd [directory] – change your current working directory to [directory].
  • rm – remove a file or directories from disk. Use this command if you don’t want to keep something on disk, but are willing to lose its information from within Linux itself (i.e., it won’t be available when needed again). You can also use rm –yes which will prompt for confirmation before removing any files/directories on your system (which is useful if something important was lost).
  • mv [-f][-i][-o][file1]… source destination where each filename is replaced by its path relative to the old location of that file; no confirmation needed! This works best with single-letter paths such as “somedir/somefile” but may not work properly if there are spaces or other symbols present in those names; try using double quotes instead: `somedir/somefile`. If you give more than one argument (two), then all arguments after them will be included; for example: `rm -rf somedir`. Note that this does not work on root user since all permissions would need changing before executing such commands

To install a .deb package in Ubuntu use the dpkg -i command.

To install a .deb package in Ubuntu use the dpkg -i command. This command installs a package called package name from the list of all packages available on the system.

To install a .rpm package in Fedora use the DNF localinstall –nogpgcheck command. 

To install a .rpm package in Fedora use the dnf localinstall –nogpgcheck command. This will install a package called mypackage-1.rpm from the list of all packages available on the system.

You can also install your own RPMs using this method, but you should make sure that they are not already installed on your system before doing so!

Open source is a philosophy that promotes access to software’s source code and unrestricted distribution of that software as well as changes or modifications made to it.

Open source is a philosophy that promotes access to software’s source code and unrestricted distribution of that software as well as changes or modifications made to it. It can be contrasted with proprietary software, which tightly controls its development, distribution and use.

Open-source software is usually free, but may have some restrictions on the use of its source code (see below).

Linux is most commonly used as an operating system on servers, due to its security, reliability and speed

Linux is most commonly used as an operating system on servers, due to its security, reliability and speed. It’s also used by many people who use the command line interface (CLI) or graphical user interface (GUI).

Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and most servers. It was originally developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991 as a Unix-like kernel for computers using Intel x86 processors.

1 The first version was released in 1993 under the name “Linux 0.01” when Torvalds decided to discard his own name and initials from the project.

2 The current version of the kernel was released in 2005, marking 25 years since its creation.

3 In addition to having a small development team working full time on it,

4  There are several unofficial distributions available including Fedora Project Red Hat Enterprise Linux Debian family etc..

The Linux command line interface is very powerful and flexible. It allows you to perform all sorts of tasks, such as system administration, file manipulation and network connectivity. With some practice, you will be able to use the command line interface in Linux like a pro!